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e. a situation in which there has been a relatively small group of breeding couples, making inbreeding more likely. There is no cure, but there is testing available so that prospective parents know whether or not they have a high chance of having offspring with the disease. Senior Nutrition FellowDr. Ruth Kava has been associated with the American Council on Science and Health for over a decade first as Director of Nutrition, and more recently as Senior Fellow in Nutrition. In connection with ACSH, she has supervised numerous publications on nutrition related issues, participated in a variety of television and radio programs e.

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01.14.2007 | 34 Comments

The breed was developed in Scotland during the mid 1900s when waterfowl hunting was an incredibly popular sport for the Scottish Elite. At the time, existing retrievers were not skilled in retrieving over both land and water so they were crossed with the best water spaniels to create the breed that is now known as the Golden Retriever. The breed was first accepted by The Kennel Club in England in 1903 but it didn’t make its way to the U. S. until 1925. Today, the Golden Retriever is consistently ranked as the third most popular breed according to AKC registration after the Labrador Retriever and the German Shepherd.

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01.14.2007 | 16 Comments

If possible, get him into puppy kindergarten class by the time he is 10 to 12 weeks old, and socialize, socialize, socialize. However, be aware that many puppy training classes require certain vaccines like kennel cough to be up to date, and many veterinarians recommend limited exposure to other dogs and public places until puppy vaccines including rabies, distemper and parvovirus have been completed. In lieu of formal training, you can begin training your puppy at home and socializing him among family and friends until puppy vaccines are completed. Not all inherited conditions are detectable in a growing puppy, and it can be hard to predict whether an animal will be free of these maladies, which is why you must find a reputable breeder who is committed to breeding the healthiest animals possible. They should be able to produce independent certification that the parents of the dog and grandparents, etc. have been screened for genetic defects and deemed healthy for breeding. At a minimum, ask the breeder to show evidence that both of the puppy’s parents have the appropriate certifications from health registries like the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, Canine Eye Registry Foundation, etc. For more information, see the Red Ribbon and Blue Ribbon requirements set by the Goldendoodle Association of North America. Whether you’re planning to get your new best friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, don’t forget that old adage “let the buyer beware”. Disreputable breeders and facilities that deal with puppy mills can be hard to distinguish from reliable operations. There’s no 100% guaranteed way to make sure you’ll never purchase a sick puppy, but researching the crossbreed so you know what to expect, checking out the facility to identify unhealthy conditions or sick animals, and asking the right questions can reduce the chances of heading into a disastrous situation.